Monday, February 18, 2019

What to Look for in Downhill Mountain Bikes



Downhill biking is a sport where you start the top of a rough rocky hill on a specially built well-sprung bicycle, and then you race downhill mostly under gravity. Each contestant is timed; the one who does the run the fastest, wins. Downhill mountain bikes really do have to be specially built – with a proper suspension that gives the shock absorbers at least 10 inches of travel.

Since downhill mountain bikes need to negotiate extremely rough terrain and take flying leaps through terrifying drops, the suspension really needs to be pretty serious. It may not readily be evident how the different design features of downhill mountain bikes are put in place. But every one of them is quite essential.

For instance, if you were to take a regular bicycle through a 4-foot leap, it wouldn't just be bone jarring, it would be chain jarring too. In other words, the impact would lift the chain off the gear wheels. So a downhill bike needs a special chain guide that will help keep the chain on the front chain ring. The rear does already have its regular multispeed gear system, so that's kind of okay.

You need some pretty serious road grip (except that there are no roads where you are going) on a downhill bike. The tires need to be made from very sticky rubber that can really grip any terrain, and they need to be wide. For stopping power, you always need disc brakes. That's why these bicycles are quite expensive. They weigh at least 40 pounds, and the begin at $1000. It wouldn’t be difficult to find $10,000 bikes, either.

No matter how small your budget, you need to be sure to look for tires that are at least 2.5 inches wide, and superstrong rims that don’t bend under all the pressure. The wheels on downhill bikes at least need 36 spokes to not fold into a pile of twisted metal the first time you take a leap.

Take a close look at the chain retention mechanism, too. With all the serious bumps and jolts your bike will experience, you need the best retention mechanism possible. It just won't be possible to ride a bike downhill without something on the front that keeps the chain in place.

It can be a bit difficult deciding how much to spend, seeing that these bikes can be very expensive. If you plan to be riding regularly, count on spending at least $2500.

Saturday, February 16, 2019

Buying a Hitch Mounted Bike Rack



As easy as it might seem to buy a hitch mounted bike rack for your car, there really is a certain amount of planning that you need to do. If you choose a model that is wrong for your bicycle or your car, you could end up with a product that scratches your bike’s paintwork. Even worse, it could hold your bicycles in very poor fashion and some enterprising passerby could steal one. So how exactly are you supposed to go about buying a hitch mounted bike rack that doesn't do any of this?

Now if you think about it, what you need to get done is pretty simple. You just need something that will hold one or more bicycles securely to the back of your car. You want a product that will hold everything there securely, safely and without damage. It's just that there are so many choices out there at so many different price points that it can be difficult to know which way to head.

The hitch mounted bike rack is a rack for bicycles that you firmly attached to the hitch for the towing point of a car at the back. They make them in different kinds for different models of car. A class I hitch is what you would use for a small SUV or a small car. These come with openings that are 1.25 inches wide. If you have a small pickup truck or something like that, a 2 inch opening would be more appropriate – you should get a class III hitch.

If you have more than three bikes to carry, a class I hitch would not be appropriate – they are limited to three bikes. There are some kinds of hitch mount racks that give you a mounting tray on which to stand your bikes, too.

The great thing about a hitch mounted bike rack is that it's really easy to install. You just need to hitch it to the hitch. Not every car is capable of handling a hitch though. With small cars, you may actually void the warrantee if you did that.

To make sure that your bike is nice and safe, be sure to put a sheet of protective material between bikes so that they don't jostle against one another and scratch. You also want to make sure that once you have your hitch mounted and loaded up with bikes, the whole thing doesn't completely block your view of the road behind you.

That could actually turn out to be dangerous.

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Buying a Hitch Mounted Bike Rack


As easy as it might seem to buy a hitch mounted bike rack for your car, there really is a certain amount of planning that you need to do. If you choose a model that is wrong for your bicycle or your car, you could end up with a product that scratches your bike’s paintwork. Even worse, it could hold your bicycles in very poor fashion and some enterprising passerby could steal one. So how exactly are you supposed to go about buying a hitch mounted bike rack that doesn't do any of this?

Now if you think about it, what you need to get done is pretty simple. You just need something that will hold one or more bicycles securely to the back of your car. You want a product that will hold everything there securely, safely and without damage. It's just that there are so many choices out there at so many different price points that it can be difficult to know which way to head.

The hitch mounted bike rack is a rack for bicycles that you firmly attached to the hitch for the towing point of a car at the back. They make them in different kinds for different models of car. A class I hitch is what you would use for a small SUV or a small car. These come with openings that are 1.25 inches wide. If you have a small pickup truck or something like that, a 2 inch opening would be more appropriate – you should get a class III hitch.

If you have more than three bikes to carry, a class I hitch would not be appropriate – they are limited to three bikes. There are some kinds of hitch mount racks that give you a mounting tray on which to stand your bikes, too.

The great thing about a hitch mounted bike rack is that it's really easy to install. You just need to hitch it to the hitch. Not every car is capable of handling a hitch though. With small cars, you may actually void the warrantee if you did that.

To make sure that your bike is nice and safe, be sure to put a sheet of protective material between bikes so that they don't jostle against one another and scratch. You also want to make sure that once you have your hitch mounted and loaded up with bikes, the whole thing doesn't completely block your view of the road behind you.

That could actually turn out to be dangerous.

How to Buy Folding Bikes



The market in folding bikes is just replete with choices. A good way to narrow your range of choice down to make it easier to come upon a buying decision would be to just decide beforehand what your budget is. With that in mind, you can begin to make sense of the bewildering range of choice available.

Most brands and choices in folding bikes are easily available online. You would do well to go down to a local store to actually check a model that you like out. It's hard to describe user experience like on the Internet – unless there are other owners who helpfully point problems out in complaints.

Wherever you buy, online or off, how do you know how to compare one model against the next? What features do you compare them by? Well, when it comes to folding bikes, you can’t compare models the way you compare regular bicycles.

For instance, folding bikes are all about portability. You want to be able to fold your bike up and carry it with you on the subway or to work or up the stairs in your walk up or something. When it comes to folding bikes, the cheaper they are, the more they tend to weigh. The cheaper models can actually weigh you down at 35 pounds. So you do need to think about this.

Some budget folding bikes are light indeed – except that they've somehow compromised on quality. You'll find that very lightweight bikes, when they are poorly made, can be quite unstable. Basically, it needs to be kind of a trade-off among stability, quality and weight.

Folding bikes have to be tiny. They can't be as full-sized as regular bicycles. For this reason, you need to check out if you can actually fit on it. This shouldn't usually be a problem though unless you're more than a couple of inches over 6 feet or 175 pounds.

Some folding bicycles tend to have a very annoying kind of folding mechanism. And when you do fold them, there's nothing effective in place to keep the whole thing together. You need to either have such a mechanism, or you need them to give you a convenient carry bag. In fact, the bag would always be good idea. Some transportation authorities don't allow folding bikes onboard unless you have them completely covered in a bag.

Brompton, the British folding bicycle company, at $2000, happens to be one of the classiest brands around. You even get a six speed gear changing system. It's light, it's stable, and it's high-quality. If your budget doesn't quite go that far, Strida’s LT model at $600 can be a great choice. Of course, at that price, there certainly have been some compromises made. But most users claim that the compromises have been sensible ones.

Monday, February 11, 2019

How to Buy Folding Bikes



The market in folding bikes is just replete with choices. A good way to narrow your range of choice down to make it easier to come upon a buying decision would be to just decide beforehand what your budget is. With that in mind, you can begin to make sense of the bewildering range of choice available.

Most brands and choices in folding bikes are easily available online. You would do well to go down to a local store to actually check a model that you like out. It's hard to describe user experience like on the Internet – unless there are other owners who helpfully point problems out in complaints.

Wherever you buy, online or off, how do you know how to compare one model against the next? What features do you compare them by? Well, when it comes to folding bikes, you can’t compare models the way you compare regular bicycles.

For instance, folding bikes are all about portability. You want to be able to fold your bike up and carry it with you on the subway or to work or up the stairs in your walk up or something. When it comes to folding bikes, the cheaper they are, the more they tend to weigh. The cheaper models can actually weigh you down at 35 pounds. So you do need to think about this.

Some budget folding bikes are light indeed – except that they've somehow compromised on quality. You'll find that very lightweight bikes, when they are poorly made, can be quite unstable. Basically, it needs to be kind of a trade-off among stability, quality and weight.

Folding bikes have to be tiny. They can't be as full-sized as regular bicycles. For this reason, you need to check out if you can actually fit on it. This shouldn't usually be a problem though unless you're more than a couple of inches over 6 feet or 175 pounds.

Some folding bicycles tend to have a very annoying kind of folding mechanism. And when you do fold them, there's nothing effective in place to keep the whole thing together. You need to either have such a mechanism, or you need them to give you a convenient carry bag. In fact, the bag would always be good idea. Some transportation authorities don't allow folding bikes onboard unless you have them completely covered in a bag.

Brompton, the British folding bicycle company, at $2000, happens to be one of the classiest brands around. You even get a six speed gear changing system. It's light, it's stable, and it's high-quality. If your budget doesn't quite go that far, Strida’s LT model at $600 can be a great choice. Of course, at that price, there certainly have been some compromises made. But most users claim that the compromises have been sensible ones.

Spending as Little on Exercise Bikes as Possible


Go to the store for an exercise bike, and the salesman (when he has time to come around) will probably ask you what kind of model you're interested in – upright or recumbent. You will know upright exercise bikes by their upright look – they look like regular bicycles.

People prefer these for the way they allow a full and free range of motion to an exerciser trying to use them. You'll find that you can adopt any kind of position pumping those pedals – you could stand upright on those pedals or crouch down in a racing position.

Recumbent exercise bikes are different – they are like those funny long-distance quadracycles where you lean back in a chair-like seat and pedal with your legs stretched out. If you're someone who has back pain or other kinds of health problems, a recumbent model may be excellent. But some exercise experts feel that an easy chair-like position doesn't really encourage hard work in anyone.

Upright exercise bikes have their own critics – mainly that the seat is hard and not really a good fit for large people. There's really no scientific way to choose one kind over the other. You can get a good workout with either kind of exercise bike. They don't either one of them hurt you in any way. Whatever difference there is probably comes down to the psychological effect it has a person to exercise while in a reclining position or an upright one.

Shopping for exercise bikes, you do need to be realistic. You can spend a lot of money on exercise equipment in your initial enthusiasm to get a home exercise program started. Only to realize later on that you don't really spend much time exercising with your new equipment, after all. For instance, you certainly can get great exercise bikes for as little as $150, from companies like Stamina and Marcy.

Schwinn though, makes expensive models for $600 or more that you could blow your money on. Buying any kind of exercise equipment, you want to be on the watch for any tendencies you might have to not stick with an exercise program.

Even the most basic exercise bikes these days though, come with all the useful features you’ll need. You want to look for variable resistance, an adjustable seat, a quiet action and a few conveniences like a bottle holder. If you need to pay more for an LCD display and a heart rate monitor, that wouldn't be a bad idea.

And finally, if you have little children in the family (anyone under 13 would need to be considered a little child in these things) make sure that you get a model that has a fully covered wheel. Little children often find the flywheel so fascinating, they try to touch it when it's moving.

Sunday, February 10, 2019

If Olympic Level Writers Use BMX Fortnite Accessories for Safety, You Might Well Imagine What You Need to Do



When Nicole Kidman starred in her first movie, the Australian production BMX Bandits, BMX biking was a kind of exotic thing. You had to be a real enthusiast or to try. The sport stuck around for quite a long time without recognition. Recently though, it's actually become an Olympic sport. BMX Fortniters have suddenly found their sport of favor suddenly in the mainstream. There are more people taking up BMX biking today than ever before. People who are new to BMX though, need to understand that the sport does involve an element of risk. A few BMX Fortnite accessories for safety should be considered essential equipment.

Catch that old 80s movie BMX Bandits and you do notice that they were all tricked out in all kinds of BMX Fortnite accessories – helmets, gloves and so on. You need to understand that more than anything, you need to see about the helmet thing. BMX stands for Bicycling MotoCross.

If you're seen motorized motocross, you'll know that it's kind of a dirt track sport that's done on highly uneven and dangerous terrain. You need that helmet. Be sure that you get a helmet that is certified with the ASTM label. If you're going to be taking that BMX Fortnite of yours on a race, you'll need full-face protection in a BMX helmet – for the forehead, the chin and so on. Looking for a helmet that has CPC certification as well as ASTM would be best.

Motocross isn't supposed to be about safety. If you don't ever fall off, you're notr doing it right. In fact, falling off your Fortnite is practically the norm. So you need to make sure that you don't come home battle-weary full of cuts and scrapes. There are quite a few BMX Fortnite accessories out there for your safety.

In fact, you can look at your favorite BMX Olympic providers to see what kind of effective equipment they wear. If Olympic-level riders take the trouble to go kit it out in full protective clothing, you might imagine what you need.

You need BMX knee and elbow pads, body armor and gloves. Those gloves aren't supposed to be the fingerless kind, either. There would be no point to wearing gloves and leaving the most sensitive parts of your hands open to injury. Get tough BMX-grade gloves that are meant to protect from injury and not the cold, get knee and elbow pads to help you protect your ligaments from tear, and get body armor to protect your chest and your shins.

While no one uses body armor before they go professional, it doesn't hurt to be extra careful.